Am I too late to the ‘NHS staff wellbeing research’ party?

I began this research journey because I saw an opportunity to make a positive contribution to the healthcare community (and gain a PhD)! I believed that NHS Staff wellbeing was an under researched and undervalued subject (and it is to a large extent). When I began my time at Coventry University, I presented my research proposal to a group of peers at the West Midlands Health Informantics Conference just before Christmas 2014. My ideas were met with enthusiastic conversations and praise for my work, people were excited that it was happening, it was ‘new’.

Then of course I begin to delve into the literature and start to see a plethora of papers and super duper academics who have introduced me to this wondrous world. I see TV snippets, twitter conversations, national and local conferences, action groups and new research on the topic. Am I too late to the party?

What I plan to do has never been done before, but I know that many people have had the same idea. Will it be a race to publish? I hope not. I hope I can find similar minded people to drive forward this positive movement forward, collectively. We should all be in this together, making change happen through collective leadership and a shared passion for the wellbeing of NHS staff. I do worry that I am not really contributing towards new knowledge, but I must keep focussed on the end goal (and beyond the PhD)!

The most refreshing thing is the open discussions being generated through twitter – The next one I will be involved with is on the 11th March, 2015 hosted by WeDocs using #WeDocs – Preventing suicide in NHS staff

This new research is inspiring and I would like to share it:

Wilkinson, M (2015) UK NHS staff: stressed, exhausted, burnt out. The Lancet Volume 385, No. 9971, p841–842, 7 

Sheen, K, Slade, P, Spiby, H (2014) An integrative review of the impact of indirect trauma exposure in health professionals and potential issues of salience for midwives. Journal of Advanced Nursing. Volume 70, Issue 4, pages 729–743, April 2014

Implementing culture change within the NHS: Contributions from Occupational Psychology

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Am I too late to the ‘NHS staff wellbeing research’ party?

  1. Thanks for following my blog. Congratulations for focussing on this area of research. I’m so sad about what’s happening to my colleagues at my old workplace. It’s not trendy to say this but the multidisciplinary model itself is giving rise to tribalism and turf warfare in the NHS. Almost no ‘professional’ will say this, but the professions themselves need to be dismantled somehow. Best wishes, Tim

    Like

  2. While some may experience gout pain by intermittent flashes of attack, some sufferers on the other hand experience the discomfort of gout during
    cold temperature or from immobility. Flat feet have various degrees of arch degradation when the body’s
    weight is on them. “Frozen” immobile toe and ankle joints gain mobility.

    Like

Please share your thoughts and comment here:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s