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#BringBackTheNHS Event – London 2015

So, yesterday I toddled on down to Westminster to attend the #BringBackTheNHS event and see what it was all about. The event was filled with great speakers, including some famous ones like: @IanMcKellen @charlottechurch and @marcuschown. This was set to be a ‘Non Political Event’ to celebrate the NHS. Nevertheless, there were some passionate words spoken.

I try not to get too political in my every day research, but it is so important that we all understand the healthcare climate in which we are working, living and healing. I also feel it is important for me to understand the continuously evolving health policies, rhetorics and visions if I am to contribute positively to the #mentalhealth and well being of Healthcare workers.

And so I came to learn about the The Campaign for the NHS Reinstatement Bill 2015 (  ) currently championed by @AllysonPollock among many others!

In a nutshell: The Health and Social Care Act of 2012, forced a commercialised model upon the NHS in England.

This new Bill aims to reinstate the founding vision for the NHS (Freee at the point of use, regardless of a persons ability to pay). A worthwhile cause to become involved with.

However, throughout the event and in listening to the speakers share some powerful NHS stories, I personally was struck by the stories involving NHS Staff. I would just like to summarise the key things I took from the evening.

– The NHS Staff will carry on giving every part of themselves to the care of others.

-The NHS staff do not go to work for themselves, but for the service of others

– NHS Staff are bound to protect/defend/obey the mother of the nation (ie. The NHS) –  as the well being of their family, friends, mothers, aunties, children etc….depend upon it.

– Front line NHS staff see the true nature of life and death. Their eyes see what others cannot comprehend or identify with. They then go back to changing beds….

-They work hard, despite being underpaid (and arguably undervalued).

-They work unsociable hours, any time, anywhere.

– Where resources are strained, they make sure that people still get what they need.

– They are still willing to give more.

The cultures of our healthcare systems and staff clearly show that ‘to give all’ is not enough. They will always give more…..Yet in times of strain, change and challenging circumstances, how will this effect the mental wellbeing of healthcare staff?

Who puts healthcare staff first?

Who makes sure that they are cared for?

Worryingly, this ‘carry on regardless’ mentality may put our healthcare staff on an even higher pedestal to perform and deliver. Will this make it even harder for those in psychological distress to seek help?

Does this ideology accept failure? – Healthcare staff are good people. They will give their all. I just hope there is someone there for them if they fall.

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Annual Virtual Conference to celebrate International Day of the Midwife 2nd May

Virtual International Day of the Midwife Conference POSTER 2015

Virtual International Day of the Midwife Conference POSTER 2015

The Virtual International Day of the Midwife (VIDM) celebrates the International Day of the Midwife by bringing midwives, students, consumers and all parties interested in childbirth from across the globe together using online electronic media. A 24 hour conference is held each year covering a wide range of topics with speakers from all over the world.

The programme is now confirmed and looks really awesome! There are so many innovative projects and events going on around the world in midwifery, this will be a great way to catch up with some of them from the comfort of home!!! – The speakers are truly global this year.

I will be one of the speakers presenting my PhD research project from the UK at 10:00 (British time) BST Saturday, 2 May 2015. I am hoping that many of you will tune in to the conference when you can. I would love to share my projects with you all!!

@VIDofM

Click here for instructions on how to join the webinar – I will be presenting at 10am UK Time (GMT).

My Abstract: This presentation will discuss a PhD project aiming to explore the value of online interventions in supporting midwives in work-related psychological distress.

Much emphasis is placed upon providing support for patients who are part of traumatic incidents, yet limited attention has been paid to the ‘second victim’, i.e. the midwives involved, who may also experience mental and emotional distress (Wu, 2000). The prevalence of these second victims has been seen to rise up to 43.3% as practitioner’s soldier on, often in silence (Wolf et al, 2000). Those affected can develop symptoms as severe as those in post-traumatic stress disorder (Rassin et al, 2005).

This presentation will educate its audience upon the psychiatric and physical morbidities associated with traumatic midwifery work, the epidemiology and etiology of ‘the second victim’ and the consequences of this under reported issue for midwifery practice. It will also offer solutions for supporting midwives in distress.

Rassin M, Kanti T, Silner D. Chronology of medication errors by nurses: accumulation of stresses and PTSD symptoms. Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2005;26:873-886.

Wu AW (2000) Medical error: the second victim. The doctor who makes the mistake needs help too. BMJ. Vol. 320 Pp.726–7.

Wolf, Z. R., Serembus, J. F., Smetzer, J., Cohen, H., & Cohen, M. (2000) Responses and concerns of healthcare providers to medication errors. Clinical Nurse Specialist. 14, 278–287.

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Partnering with the Colombo Institute of Research and Psychology – Sri Lanka…

colombo institute of research and psychology

colombo institute of research and psychology

I apologize for the lack of posts over the last 2 weeks. I have been to visit the wonderful people in the Colombo Institute of Research and Psychology and the National Institute of Mental Health, Angoda.Then of course I had to deal with copious amounts of work/emails upon my return, which I am sure will fill exciting posts to come.

When I embarked upon this research journey, I also signed up for the Global Leaders Programme at Coventry University. I did this to become a part of the global healthcare community and reach key opinion leaders with the same directive goals as myself…Starting the conversation has always been the most productive way to make change happen. Indeed, it has already put me in touch with some inspiring people, and this trip proved to be no different.

I have always had a keen interest in getting to know how the various healthcare systems across our globe work. We are all human… so what works best? I have already visited the Royal Victoria Teaching Hospital in Banjul, The Gambia and the Gimbie Adventist Hospital, Ethiopia. With the help of Maternity Worldwide and clinical work placements, I was privileged to have the opportunity to see how our health care systems contrast and compare to other healthcare systems around the globe. I was excited to take part in this visit, which promised to enlighten us all to the mental healthcare provisions and psychology research in Sri Lanka.

National Institute of Mental Health, Angoda Colombo, Sri Lanka

National Institute of Mental Health, Angoda Colombo, Sri Lanka

Speaking with the researchers in the Colombo Institute of Research and Psychology, it was clear that their research shared the same concerns as western research. Healthy debates generated interesting insights into the work they were forming in breaking stigma and securing new funding for the people of Sri Lanka. However, their population base faces some new and very real challenges:

-Less than 1% of Sri Lankas healthcare budget is spent on the mental health care of the nation.

-Sri Lankan communities often use astrology and homeopathic remedies to treat mental ill health rather than access medical facilities.

– There are only 2 psychiatric consultants for the whole of Colombo and surrounding areas.

-Limited facilities for mother and baby units, which need more space for mentally unwell mothers and their families. (In Sri Lanka, reported maternal death due to suicide is notably high) – See Puerperal Psychosis.

– The stigma around mental health issues remains great in Sri Lanka, therefore many of those who may be ready to re-enter their communities following treatment have no where to return to. They become rejected by their families.

– This stigma creates a culture where those in need are reluctant to seek help.

– Families are keen not to disclose the mental ill health of loved ones and may isolate problems.

-Mental health facilities are used as holding places for those on remand following the identification of the antisocial behavioral symptoms of ill mental health.

Speaking to one of the consultant psychiatrists about these issues was so valuable to my research. Comparing the etiologies of psychological distress with the cultures and social norms of both populations highlighted how our UK populations may face triggers for distress which are entirely unique to the UK. Although some of these factors will also translate to other populations, it may be that specific factors correlate only with our own health care professionals, within western society.

From the point of view of research, this leaves much to be explored. How do we breakdown the populations into completely homogeneous samples? Is it ever possible to?

After speaking with Dr Shavindra Dias from the University of Peradeniya, (which by the way is the most beautiful university campus I have ever seen!) it is clear that the connections I have made throughout this research trip will last throughout my career as I continue to network with and learn from some of the most outstanding and inspirational leaders who take pride in making changes to ensure a brighter future for all. The struggle to improve the overall well being of society by authenticating and placing value upon the needs of those in psychological distress is hard. Yet I still believe that is the most noble and kind thing we can do for humanity. The connections I have made throughout this trip will forever remain a part of my professional journey going forward, and I would like to thank @PsychColombo again for hosting such an amazing trip of discovery in partnership with @covcampus.

In addition to this wonderful experience we also visited:

-Galle Face Green

-Galle Fort

-The National Museum of Colombo

-International Maritime Museum in Colombo

– The National Elephant Orphanage

-The Temple of the Tooth

-Anuradhapura

-Botanical Gardens

-Tea Factories

View from the World Trade Centre in Colombo

View from the World Trade Centre in Colombo

Sri Lankan Elephant Orphanage

Sri Lankan Elephant Orphanage

I hope to reunite with the amazing people I met here soon…. Perhaps for my up and coming Delphi Study?