0

Making Birth better: How research shapes practice #bbresearch17

Indulging in my passion for research, I am today reflecting on my time at  …an intimate conference made into a delightful day thanks to  & …More specifically …    &   …

I personally enjoyed this as a more intimate conference, where deeper conversations could get the brain working on what was really needed in maternity services and health research…Another reflection of the day can be seen on Steller here…

As you can see, we had a great line up for the day, and a fish and chip lunch no less!

Highlights for me include:

Stop sexualising breastfeeding!!!! The great presentation by

Learning about associated with at with

Learning so much about at with Prof. Soo Downe

Getting a wave from miles away from  across the miles sending & midwifery love to us all …..❤️

Powerful words from at …. how do we cope as midwives, & ensure excellence in maternity care?

And of course.. # learning all about making sure that blood goes to baby with  with ❤️

Learning about the barriers to identifying poor shared by prof at  with 🎓

Yet there were a couple of overarching themes that came from the day…including….

 

Thank you to everyone who came to see these wonderful presentations (including those who came to see my own presentation of course – you gave me lots to think about!)!…and thank you all for such an intimate and heartwarming day discussing my favorite topic…Research in Midwifery 😍…

 

And a last word from the Head of Midwifery at Hinchingbrooke  Hospital….(Heather Gallagher)…..

bbresearch

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaro; The Academic Midwife; This blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤

 

0

A reflection on #internationaldayofthemidwife (#IDM2017)

International day of the midwife

Happy #internationaldayofthemidwife or () as it is indeed the 5th of May 2017. I wanted to do a quick reflection (and a little dance of happiness) about the fact that the focus of this year’s International Day of the Midwife is…

 “Midwives, Mothers and Families: Partners for Life!”

With messages coming from the International Confederation such as…”It is very important that midwives and mothers both acknowledge the reciprocity of their relationship” – Scarlett

Yes…..we work in PARTNERSHIP with women and their families!…mothers, families and midwives are all equal partners….this means that we can finally break the mold and state openly that we, as midwives can also be prioritised!…Fabulous!

I have often wondered whether terms such as ‘Patient comes first’ is really healthy…as it is terms like this which often infer that midwives come second at best. What do you think?

service and sacrifice

I have also been picking up on some other great messages, pictures and videos this ..such as…..

 

 

I have also been dipping in and out of the Virtual International Day of the Midwife conference sessions a FREE conference that happens online every year….I have presented my work at  () before, and it is such a great opportunity to get people together in one place from all over the world!

This year for  I have recorded a podcast ‘Made by midwives for midwives’. Hosted by London based midwives Anthonissa Moger and Kate Whatmough….  (The Midwifery Podcast: Os closed, go home.)..I will be sharing this in an upcoming blog post…but for now..I am off to enjoy the rest of …there is such positivity in the midwifery world today…Let’s keep the momentum going ❣🎓❣

 

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaro; The Academic Midwife; This blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤

1

Mindfulness and Self-Care in Midwifery

As my main research interests are firmly rooted within supporting a positive staff experience for healthcare workers, especially midwives in work-related psychological distress, I am always looking for new opportunities to share knowledge with others in this area. …The Global Alliance for Nursing and Midwifery (GANM) is a joint project sponsored by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Nursing Knowledge, Information Management & Sharing at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. This blog post provides an overview of a webinar session hosted by GANM entitled “Mindfulness and Self-Care in Midwifery:  Review of Current Evidence and Guided Mindfulness Practice.

For a preliminary introduction to this topic – check out an earlier blog post on this topic entitled “Midwife Burnout: A Brief Summary“.

downtimes

Erin Wright, DNP, CNM, APRN-BC, led the conversation…Participants were diverse, and originated from Canada, Peru, US (Baltimore, Urbana, Birmingham, Atlanta, Buffalo), Ireland, UK (Coventry University and School of Healthcare Sciences Cardiff), Brazil, Montserrat, and Trinidad.

The full webinar can be accessed here.

Much of the research covered, has also been captured within my earlier narrative review: Pezaro, Sally, et al. “‘Midwives Overboard!’Inside their hearts are breaking, their makeup may be flaking but their smile still stays on.” Women and Birth 29.3 (2016): e59-e66.

However, there were some new and interesting comparisons made with more recent research here…

“Four common themes have been identified that traverse the different models of care. The NZ study provides insight into how case load midwifery can be sustainable enabling long term sustainability. The UK study highlights healthy resilient practices that enable practice. What remains uncertain is how models of care enable or disable sustainable long term practice and nurture healthy resilient behaviours within the different models of care”.

comparisons

“The notion of resilience in midwifery as the panacea to resolve current concerns may need rethinking as the notion may be interpreted as expecting midwives ‘to toughen up’ in a working setting that is socially, economically and culturally challenging.”

Sources (Crowther, Susan, et al. “Sustainability and resilience in midwifery: A discussion paper.” Midwifery 40 (2016): 40-48.)

So we are now much enlightened as to how and why midwives are experiencing distress, we also have some insights into how they try to cope (or not)…and where this distress may affect maternity services…but what we are yet to learn, is what may be most effective in supporting midwives in work-related psychological distress…although a few clues are emerging….

Mindfulness is coming forward as a potential tool of support..stress management, education and clinical supervision may also be of benefit to midwives in distress…But how, why and how much is not yet clear.

After exploring the literature in relation to psychological distress in midwifery populations, we were all invited to join in some mindfulness practice..What is mindfulness?

Image result for mindfulness

 

Feeling overwhelmed?…TRY….R.A.I.N

RRecognize What’s Going On

AAllowing: Taking a Life-Giving Pause

I—Investigating with Kindness

NNatural Loving Awareness

Source: Mindful.org

relation-ships

Recommended further reading

Youtube presenters:

  • Jon Kabat Zinn
  • Elisha Goldstein
  • Tara Brach
  • Sharon Salzberg

Websites/Audio Links:

Books: 

  • A Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction Workbook (Goldstein and Stahl)
  • Everyday Catastrophe Living (Jon Kabat Zinn)
  • Wherever you go there you are (Jon Kabat Zinn)
  • Mindfulness for Beginners (Jon Kabat Zinn)
  • Real Happiness (Sharon Salzberg)
  • The Mindful Nurse (Carmel Sheridan)

For more mindfulness exercises, visit the UCLA Mindfulness Awareness Research Center.

book-mark

Thanks for a very insightful and informative session!

Until next time…Look after yourselves & each other 🦄💫🎓

0

‘Making & Breaking the Maternity Experience’#Uclhmw2016 – A midwifery conference

Attending and presenting work on midwife wellbeing at , I was thrilled to see so much of one conference dedicated to supporting the midwife, as well as the mother. I was also keen to hear  Jacqui Dunkley-Bent update us all on the new plans for maternity services in 2017! – Bring it on!

-Improvement in Perinatal mental health in maternity services was highest on the agenda as we can see here – midwives were really responsive to making these a commitments a reality.

Yet we can see that NHS England is also looking to transform the workforce as part of this plan. There are so many ideas buzzing around my head at the moment that I am feeling dizzy… “so much to do and so little time” – As Willy Wonka would say.

We also saw how mothers are experiencing poor support in decision making…

Both  and  really must be heard by all midwives, everywhere, more often! Read more about these experiences here. …and here.

Women are roaring for change!

Christine Armstrong

There are so many great resources available from dignity in childbirth … We really need to challenge the way that women experience respect in maternity care.

And the #CaringForYou campaign?

Sadly, bullying still a real issue in midwifery, as  confirmed … punity, public shaming & undermining must stop.. We must be kinder to one another…remember why we became midwives in the first place and love each other for the critical safety of mothers and their babies.

…..more ❤️ is needed!

We must ‘Create a positive culture’ –   says at 

What can we do?

There is indeed much to be done. I wanted to personally thank , and @MaureenMcCabe15 (and their teams) for looking after me so well as a speaker at this conference myself. I have never been so well looked after at a conference 😘😍

And thank you to all of those who appreciated my presentation and engaged in this very important work. I love this particular image that people have been sending me (see below)…I believe it was created at the#BirthTrauma2016 conference & shares a powerful message 💜💙💚

No automatic alt text available.

There really is so much to do and so little time!

Image result for so much to do and so little time willy wonka

As a last thought introduced to us by Sheena Byrom ‘Midwives are humming birds never too small to make a difference’

Until next time – Take care of yourselves & each other ❤💚💙💛

0

💚💜❤Preventing Birth Trauma at #artofbirth16💚💜❤

Recently, I was asked by Dr. Gloria Esegbona from the @art_of_birth to share some of my thoughts on birth trauma at the latest  summit at Kings College London. My first thought, as always was…. do you mean physical? or psychological?… I was assured that her latest event would be addressing both. Time to learn & grow 💚💜❤

art-of-birth-event-with-sally-pezaro-2016

And so how can we as midwives prevent physical birth trauma?

“we can reduce ventouse to and with left lateral & slow head delivery

“Preventable physical to & caused by poor positions and outdated pushing practices

Quiz – Which methods of pushing during vaginal delivery and pelvic floor relate to which perineal outcomes?

(No peeking at the link to get the answers first!)

#Discuss #GetYourGeekOn

Methods:
-open-glottis technique?
-Valsalva pushing?
———————-
Outcomes:
-incidence of instrumental and cesarean delivery?
-incidence of postpartum hemorrhage?
-urinary incontinence
-Episiotomy rates?
-maternal satisfaction?
-fetal heart rate (FHR) abnormalities?
-Apgar score?

No peeking at the answers link before you comment/answer below!

(We are still awaiting more evidence in any case)!

The Art of Birth is promoting art in the science of to prevent #birthtrauma 

And so what about the psychological trauma and the 2nd victim…the midwife?

Can we begin to understand women’s experiences in relation to psychological birth trauma? How do we revisit the language we use during birth? Can we all be more compassionate in our practice?

I was quoted on this day when talking about “superhero midwives” – healthy, well-supported lead to healthy, well-supported mums. …It is true…so many people wanting to do good….some burning out. Some traumatised.

I thank you all for hearing about my work on the wellbeing of midwives in the workplace.

I had some really great panel questions too…What I loved most about this conference was that I managed to receive lots of  and create  with so many inspiring midwives, doulas, students and others wanting to support each other, share and learn  💚💜❤.. I can’t wait to see some of you in the near future and learn more about how you have turned these lessons into practice. 💚💜❤

Until next time – look after yourselves and each other #GetYourGeekOn 💚💜❤

0

Reflecting on the #MaternalDeath report from @mbrrace as a midwife…💜

During the December of 2016, everyone involved in the provision of care for childbearing women (and the women themselves) began to reflect upon the findings of the latest Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Death. As a midwife, I am dedicated to supporting, protecting and caring for other midwives, childbearing women, babies their families. There is no doubt in my mind that these deaths have affected all of these groups profoundly, and society as a whole. But before we begin to reflect, let’s remember that the mortality surrounding childbirth (in the UK) is thankfully rare 

    

 

When we lose mothers…we also tragically effect babies…The Stillbirth and Neonatal Deaths charity (Sands) responds to new MBRRACE maternity report here

There is no doubt that we must learn from all of these  as the president of the explains here. Clearly there is much learning to do and many improvements to make. These key messages should remind us all to ask the question…start the conversation…notice the subtle clinical cues which alert us all to danger, react to risk and remain emotionally intelligent to the needs of childbearing women.

However, what struck me most was the sheer number of women who die from mental health related causes. The MBRRACE report found that “one in seven of the women who died during the period of review died by suicide. Although severe maternal mental illness is uncommon, it can develop very quickly in women after birth; the woman, her family and mainstream mental health services may not recognise this or move fast enough to take action”.

Image result for maternal mental health related deaths mbrrace

You can read the ‘expert’ reaction to MBRRACE-UK report citing mental health as main cause of perinatal death here. Maternal mental health matters – toolkit now available from for those developing a community perinatal mental health service.

Learning to save maternal lives and making change happen will not only improve the lives of mothers, babies and families. It will also improve the lives of midwives, as they will be better equipped to give the care they would like to give as their job satisfaction improves. When the psychological wellbeing of midwives is left uncared for, maternity services may see less safe maternity care. When we care for midwives, the safety and quality of maternity care may also improve. This will in turn contribute to a reduction in maternal mortality rates. So when we are looking to improve maternity care for women, their families and their babies, lets make sure that we also look to support those who are caring for them. It really is two sides of the same coin.

What can we promote?

= That it’s “OK to ask”

How can we support women & midwives? = With trust, compassion & respect

How can we improve safety?

= Evidence based care & excellent communication

 

Preventable maternal morbidity and mortality is associated with the absence of timely access to quality care, defined as too little, too late (TLTL)—ie, inadequate access to services, resources, or evidence-based care—and too much, too soon (TMTS)—ie, over-medicalisation of normal antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal care.

Although many structural factors affect quality care, adherence to evidence-based guidelines could help health-care providers to avoid TLTL and TMTS.

TLTL—historically associated with low-income countries—occurs everywhere there are disparities in socio-demographic variables, including, wealth, age, and migrant status. Often disparities in outcomes are due to inequitable application of timely evidence-based care.

TMTS—historically associated with high-income countries—is rapidly increasing everywhere, particularly as more women use facilities for childbirth. Increasing rates of potentially harmful practices, especially in the private sector, reflect weak regulatory capacity as well as little adherence to evidence-based guidelines.

Caesarean section is a globally recognised maternal health-care indicator, and an example of both TLTL and TMTS—with disparate rates between and within countries, and higher rates in private practice and higher wealth quintiles. Caesarean section rates are highest in middle-income countries and rising in most low-income countries. Although researchers partly attribute the increase and variable rates to a shortage of clear, clinical guidelines and little adherence to existing guidelines, multiple factors—economic, logistical, and cultural—affect caesarean section rates.

Quality clinical practice guidelines need to be developed that reflect consensus among guideline developers, using similar language, similar strengths of recommendation, and agreement on direction of recommendations.

Strategies for enhanced implementation and adherence to guidelines need multisectorial input and rigorous implementation science.

A global approach that supports effective and sustained implementation of respectful, evidence-based care for routine antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal care is urgently needed.

There is much work to be done. Until next time, take care of yourselves and each other 💜💙💛

0

Birth Rights & Attitudes Towards Autonomy in Maternity Care

This blog post shares some of my learnings from and reflections of a seminar I attended recently, hosted by the Birthrights group at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire. I have always found medical law very challenging to understand, even having studied it at Masters level…I am still largely perplexed by the complexity of it all. Yet this session seemed to simplify things for me, offering case studies and easy to understand facts…for which I am very grateful! For further learning, please see more factsheets here.

Many of the topics under discussion were drawing from the work of the White Ribbon alliance, which I am highly drawn to in their quest to promote the wellbeing of midwives for the benefit of services around the world. Below I will discuss a few of the topics highlighted which have aroused my interest in relation to my own practice.

“Women have the right to choose how and where to give birth, but they do not have the right to put their baby at risk”. – (Lancet 2010).

This publication evoked moral discomfort within me immediately. Having previously practiced as a home birth midwife, I am used to challenging the notion that home birth is a less safe option where mothers put their babies at risk. As with many studies which examine the safety of various birth places, I often see biases where the skill of the birth attendant and other relevant factors are seemingly ignored to promote the argument that ‘It wouldn’t have happened if you had only been in hospital’…But the thought that women are putting their babies at risk (and choosing to do this) fundamentally goes against my own clinical knowledge and beliefs.

This paper has led to some women having forced cesarean sections…surely this is a path which nobody wishes to go down.

The discussion and debate around fetal rights has also led to mothers being prosecuted for drinking alcohol during pregnancy. This is a moral pathway which sees the woman become a vessel for a means to an end, rather than being an end in her own right. Again, do we really want to take this path? Having explored ethical arguments myself, I think there is a better way..

In this same vein, the issue of when a fetus has rights or not has also been debated and contextualized. Now that the 24 week limit upon abortions has been lifted (decriminalized), it is clear that the mother has more choice in her reproductive decision making abilities. For me, this can only be a good thing.

Human rights-based approaches guided by the World Health Organisation

  • Non-discrimination: The principle of non-discrimination seeks ‘…to guarantee that human rights are exercised without discrimination of any kind based on race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status such as disability, age, marital and family status, sexual orientation and gender identity, health status, place of residence, economic and social situation’.
  • Availability: A sufficient quantity of functioning public health and health care facilities, goods and services, as well as programmes.
  • Accessibility: Health facilities, goods and services accessible to everyone. Accessibility has 4 overlapping dimensions:
    • non-discrimination;
    • physical accessibility;
    • economical accessibility (affordability);
    • information accessibility.

Healthcare practices that violate human rights: Drawn from the Charter for Respectful Maternity Care

Physical Abuse: Episiotomy , non consensual force, restraint, unnecessary procedures, failure to provide pain relief

Disrespect: Verbal abuse, bullying, blaming, shaming and reprimanding

Non-confidential Care: Unauthorized revelations and psychical exposure

Non-consented Care: Anything performed without adequate information or dialogue to enable autonomous decision making, or with undue pressure

Misinformed Care: biased, non transparent information given, which inhibits a woman’s ability to make an informed choice

Depersonalized Care: Inflexible application of policies or guidance, which fail to take into account of a woman’s individual circumstances.

Discriminatory Care: Unequal treatment based upon personal attributes (age, race, religion).

Abandonment of Care: Refusal to provide care due to inability to pay or birth choices (or any reason)!

Check out the Birthrights info on human rights in childbirth here

Image result for human rights

Attitudes to Autonomy

Lastly, the following statement from a paper published in 2013 had me thinking about the impact of blame cultures within our maternity services.

“Both maternity care professionals demonstrated a poor understanding of their own legal accountability, and the rights of the woman and her fetus. Midwives and doctors believed the final decision should rest with the woman; however, each also believed that the needs of the woman may be overridden for the safety of the fetus. Doctors believed themselves to be ultimately legally accountable for outcomes experienced in pregnancy and birth, despite the legal position that all health care professionals are responsible only for adverse outcomes caused by their own negligent actions.”

The statement outlines how both midwives and doctors are happy to accept that the mother has the right to make any final decisions, yet they were under the impression that it was them a the practitioner who would be legally accountable for any adverse outcomes which occurred. This may be in part due to the nature of our regulatory and litigation systems, which can invoke a fear in practitioners that they will be ‘blamed’ in some way for any adverse outcomes.

Yet adverse outcomes occur all of the time, in any case, and sometimes cannot be controlled. This is of course very sad…yet it is also an inevitable reality of some women’s childbearing experience. Nobody’s fault.

When women have true autonomy and the power to make their own decisions around childbirth, they also have inherent accountabilities in relation to the choices they make.

That is why it is more important than ever to make sure that we are recording the conversational dialogue that we are exchanging with women. Consent forms really have no use unless the information can be recalled and maintained. The law dictates that we must be open, honest and avoid influence in open discussion with women.

I personally believe that these conversations would be best recorded in digital format. See my paper on this here.

As always, it is the relationships we build with women that will always be the key to building trust, opening dialogues and beginning advocatory conversations which support women’s ability to make truly informed decisions. We must work in partnership with women and the wider multidisciplinary team in order to ensure that women can make the right decisions for them, and in turn take accountability for the decisions they make. We can only do our best in managing any situation to the best of our abilities as midwives (and as any other clinician). That is what we are personally accountable for.

Image result for human rights
(Image via http://hakam.org.my/wp/)

Until next time – Look after yourselves and each other  💛💙💜💚