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Debunking Midwifery Myths

New article published here: Oh baby: seven things you probably didn’t know about midwives

…please share it widely!

dad with baby

As I am now coming to the end of my PhD (With lot’s of new and exciting things on the horizon I hope), I have been delving into the depths of the largest global online survey of midwives to date – the voices of over 2470 midwives in 93 countries!

Not only is this really an awesome and very important piece of work… it also holds some quite harrowing findings for our beloved midwifery profession. Yet this report also indicates that – if the voices of midwives are listened to, and if midwives are enabled to overcome gender inequalities and assume positions of leadership – quality of care can be improved for women and newborns globally. Wow….OK…we had better get to work then!

ALSO…

“Professionally, 89% of respondents reported that a clear understanding of what midwifery involves is critical for change to take place. Concerns were also expressed over the perceived devaluing of midwifery combined with the increasing medicalisation of birth.”

 

baby on blue

Professionally, the participants expressed concern about a lack of understanding of what “midwifery” is, the devaluing of the midwifery profession combined with the increasing medicalisation of birth, and the underlying weakness in midwifery education and regulation.

Now, I don’t claim to be able to fix the world in a day..but there was one thing that I thought I may be able to do from behind my PC. I could get an article published in @ConversationUK about the midwifery profession…perhaps I could even debunk some myths and set the record straight!…

I had my article published…please share it widely via the link below:

Oh baby: seven things you probably didn’t know about midwives

Now I was limited in this article. Limited in words and in how many points I was able to make in one article…editors need to keep their publications engaging!..and so yes…I did not manage to publish everything in this article as I would have liked to…and yes there are many many more myths about midwives that need to be debunked. But I am hoping that this will the a start of a new conversation.

Midwifery is defined as “skilled, knowledgeable and compassionate care for childbearing women, newborn infants and families across the continuum from pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, birth, postpartum and the early weeks of life” and it should be celebrated at every opportunity.

Let’s keep the conversation going around the importance of the midwifery profession. Midwives are crucial to the delivery of high quality maternal and newborn care and subsequent reductions in maternal and newborn mortality around the world. Yet they must be celebrated, respected and supported.

The core characteristics of midwifery include “optimising normal biological, psychological, social and cultural processes of reproduction and early life, timely prevention and management of complications, consultation with and referral to other services, respecting women’s individual circumstances and views, and working in partnership with women to strengthen women’s own capabilities to care for themselves and their families” – Can we start to spread the word on this now please?

baby on back

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaro; The Academic Midwife; This blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤

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#NewResearch published on route to supporting #NHS staff in distress

This month I have had 2 pieces of  published with 2 of my favorite co-authors…@WendyClyne1 (Senior Research Fellow; Research Development Lead; Coventry University, Coventry · Centre for Technology Enabled Health Research) &  (Medical Doctor; King’s College London, London · Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences).

New Research word cloud

Wendy and I asked an expert panel what should be prioritised in the development of an online intervention designed to support midwives in work-related psychological distress. We did this via the Delphi methodology, and you can see the published protocol for this research here. Overall, participants agreed that in order to effectively support midwives in work-related psychological distress, online interventions should make confidentiality and anonymity a high priority, along with 24-hour mobile access, effective moderation, an online discussion forum, and additional legal, educational, and therapeutic components. It was also agreed that midwives should be offered a simple user assessment to identify those people deemed to be at risk of either causing harm to others or experiencing harm themselves, and direct them to appropriate support. You can read this full results paper here.

As this group of experts agreed that midwives would need both confidentiality and anonymity online in order to seek and engage with effective support, Wendy, Clare and I decided to explore the ethical issues associated with these provisions. We did this by conducting a Realist Synthesis Review. You can read our full review here.

We largely argue that..

In supporting midwives online, the principles of anonymity, confidentiality and amnesty may evoke some resistance on ethical grounds. However, without offering identity protection, it may not be possible to create effective online support services for midwives. The authors of this article argue that the principles of confidentiality, anonymity and amnesty should be upheld in the pursuit of the greatest benefit for the greatest number of people.

We now call upon the wider health and social care communities to join us in a further dialogue in relation to this in pursuit of robust ethical stability…Care to join us in this?

– Comment below or make contact via this contact form:

The findings of this research will inform the development of an online intervention designed to support midwives in work-related psychological distress, and we sincerely wish to express our gratitude to all of the participants who have contributed to this project so far.

Ongoing plans include the scaling up of this project to support other health care populations to enhance the well being of staff, patients and the NHS as a whole.

The best is yet to come. Until then, take care of yourselves and each other.

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Midwives in distress: Working towards a consensus in the solution

Firstly, the reason that it has taken me a while to write here is that I have been buried in the most fascinating data from round one of my Delphi study to achieve consensus in the development of an online intervention designed to support midwives in work-related psychological distress. I won’t spoil the results for you, as I hope to be publishing the results in the new year, but suffice to say, there were many conflicted opinions, new ideas and strong voices within this expert panel.

I am very excited to move forward with this project in light of these responses!

This project now feels as if it is starting to belong to the people who have been a part of this so far. They are shaping the vision for this, and growing it with their support…. Its awesome!

Last month I was also finalising the revisions for my latest paper , ‘Midwives Overboard!’ Inside their hearts are breaking, their makeup may be flaking but their smile still stays on. This latest output was kindly co-authored by Wendy ClyneAndrew TurnerEmily A. Fulton, and Clare Gerada. I for one am very proud of this piece of work, as it shines a light upon the current situation, in which midwives all around the world are indeed suffering in psychological distress. Writing this piece not only became cathartic in resolving my own professional experiences, but it has also reinforced to me that there is a real need and desire to design an intervention to support midwives….and now I am a little closer to turning this vision into practice.

You can reach the 2nd round of the Delphi study here (This study is now invite only, but watch out for new opportunities to become involved in more research soon)!

I have been submitting papers to conference so that I may begin to share these results in person…but I will not have this opportunity until the ‘Great Minds Don’t Think Alike’ – Nursing and Midwifery Conference, in January 2016.

I hope to meet some of you there!