0

What makes a good midwifery manager? Satisfaction vs Dissatisfaction in the workplace

Reducing stress and fatigue among maternity staff is key to reducing baby deaths and brain injuries during childbirth, according to a detailed new analysis published by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

This ‘each baby counts’ initiative confirms that “Decision-making is more difficult when staff feel stressed or tired”.

“This report shows that there is a need for additional support for our maternity staff and units so that every mother and every family has the healthiest possible outcome from pregnancy and birth,” said Judy Ledger, founder and chief executive of the charity Baby LifeLine.

This news supports my own research quest, as I work to find new interventions to support midwives in work-related psychological distress.

This state of affairs also suggests that it may be prudent to do all that we can to ensure midwife satisfaction in the workplace. In fact, anything good in the workplace has to be safer/better than the bad stuff right?

At the 31st International Confederation of Midwives’ Triennial Congress held in June 2017, I stumbled upon an interesting research presentation on what could promote satisfaction/dissatisfaction in the midwifery workplace. More specifically, the characteristics of midwifery management behaviors were used to demonstrate what might promote satisfaction and dissatisfaction in managerial relationships. I will translate my brief notes from the session here:

In promoting workplace satisfaction, a midwifery manager:

  • Is supportive
  • Respects, values and appreciates midwives
  • Is an advocate for staff
  • Follows through on promises
  • Facilitates new ventures and learning
  • Cares for staff
  • Is aware of stressors

In promoting workplace dissatisfaction, a midwifery manager:

  • Is punitive
  • Is demanding
  • Is inconsistent
  • Is ineffectual
  • Is ‘Terrible’
  • Tolerates or perpetrates bullying
  • Does not listen

Not a big shock here right?…I mean it’s not rocket science. Nevertheless, this knowledge must be shared in order to promote healthy workplace cultures in the pursuit of excellence in maternity care.

The best midwifery care can only be delivered by midwives at their best…. Can we all begin to set our working day by these rules? Can we all be a little kinder? caring?..respectful to one another?

fist pump

This was just one of the many things learnt at this year’s 

In time, I will try to share more about why 

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaroThe Academic MidwifeThis blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤

 

Advertisements
0

10 Tips for Success & Self-Care for Academics

cozy-dog

Another guilt trip about the importance of self care and being successful? That is why many people will read blog posts like this. We know we should be practising self care and succeeding, but do we really know how to thrive?

(I could not find a concept analysis for either success or self care – please let me know if you do)

We must presume that both success and self-care mean something different to each and every one of us. I am no expert on these topics…. is anyone?…But I think I am pretty good at caring for myself now and working towards success…having learnt the hard way. So I thought I would share some of my hints and tips. Feel free to adapt them, use them, completely ignore them, or ridicule them as ‘poppycock’.

Most people will expect to hear things like:

  • Take a bubble bath
  • Watch your favorite film
  • Curl up with a good book
  • Work hard
  • Network

But I am sure that you know about this kind of stuff already. So let’s look at self care and success for the academic, firstly by identifying the issues that some of us may face.

As an early career researcher, I am frequently told about the stereotyping and inequalities experienced by women in academia. I myself frequently worry about the insecurity of, and problems associated with being an early career researcher, especially a female one.…I worry about where I will find my next job, funding or co-author. I worry about whether I am making any impact at all and whether I will be able to reach my true potential as an academic in the current climate. Academic pressures are in no way restricted to those earlier in their career, many more established researchers are also feeling the strain. These experiences will undoubtedly result in some psychological distress for many academics. So what can we do both proactively and preventatively to improve the lives of ourselves and each other.

Research can seem like a lot of hard work for little reward.

Tip One: Keep your eye on the goal. Visualize yourself being happy, frequently. How would it feel to publish that paper? Get that fellowship? Collaborate on that project? Create your own self-fulfilling prophecy rather than focus on a possible spiral of doom.

How to do this? – Identify what makes you happy, or what will make you happy. Then do more of what makes you happy, or have a real go at getting what will make you happy. I personally love my research work. I know that many other academics feel the same way. Happiness to me is succeeding, making a difference  and making a real impact through my work. The stress I feel is associated with this not happening.

This stress and negative thinking serves no purpose unless it positively drives me towards my goal. Yet who wants to be whipped to the goal posts?  I use visualization as a driver for success. I see myself feeling and being the way I want to be…and I allow myself to believe that this vision will come true. This makes me much happier than thinking about the alternative. So I stick with it.

The practice of meditation may also assist you to work through your thoughts, direct them towards a more positive outlook and allow your goals to become meaningful and achievable.

As these tips continue, think about your own goals for happiness…whatever they may be…think about achieving them in relation to these tips and your own experiences.

I behave in the way I want to feel or be… Surely if I continue in this direction. Good things will come…

Tip Two: The problem of job insecurity for early career academics baffles me as Job security for early career researchers is a significant factor in helping research make an impact. Yet this seems to play on my mind recurrently. It is always a worry. However, worry really does nothing to resolve this issue, and only seeks to get in the way of my progress. In order to progress, I will need to ‘work smarter’ and embrace confidence in my own abilities. Worry and negative thinking has no place in this strategy.

Negative thoughts often lie, and so I swipe them away one by one by placing them on a train that is passing the station (Visualization) – I then sit for a little longer, and imagine the way I will feel and be once I reach my goals. My mood and stress instantly lifts once I do this. I am more confident and feel much stronger. I am ready to be happy.

 

Tip 3: Say No and be proactive – We need to look at what successful academics do. From my observations, they often say ‘No’ to anything that doesn’t suit their own focused agenda (they remove the ‘noise’ and toxicity), they ooze positivity, they are confident, they are assertive, they tell people what they need to succeed and they hang around with the most inspiring people. Therefore, the most obvious strategy is for us to do the same. Say ‘No’ to negativity, and to the people and things which do not enrich us as people. Let people know what you need in order to thrive. Embrace those you feel drawn towards as positive people.

Activity: Making the best of me…

1: Ask yourself how others can get the best out of you

2: Offer what you can realistically do

3: Communicate what inhibits your productivity with others

4: Actively describe what you need from others in order to thrive

Getting the best of me

Tip 4: Express gratitude and forgiveness for enhanced wellbeing. Not always easy, but worth investing in. This task not only unburdens your mind, but allows you to see all of the good things currently going on in your life. Regularly write down 5 things that you are grateful for. Also…try to forgive yourself, and others…often.

 

Tip 5: Address your work life balance as a fluid entity. I believe that the idea of a separate home and work life is changing. This is a good thing. It takes the pressure off and allows you to be a whole person, rather than one split in two…See yourself as a whole being, a working, living and family centred being. You cannot slice yourself into pieces.

See this blog -> ‘Work’ is a verb rather than a noun…it is something we do…not always somewhere we go…

Living in the ‘now’ rather than being at either home or work also allows us to enjoy more of ourselves and our lives. Notice where you are, what you are doing…Smell the flowers, look around you as you move, work, play and just allow yourself to ‘be’.

smell-the-flowers

Tip 6: Eat Sleep move, repeat. It really is that simple, but utterly essential for optimum productivity, stress reduction, health and wellbeing. Eat nutritious food regularly, sleep 7-8 hours a night and move…Exercise, walk, swim, run, cycle…Be outdoors as often as possible.

float

Tip 7: Write. Write your thoughts, your feelings, your ‘to do’ lists, your ideas, your goals down regularly. This not only means that they are out of your head, allowing your mind to be quieter, they are also made real…They are good to share..and worth addressing (when you feel able).

Tip 8: Talk about who you are. There is a tendency to talk about work first. What we do, what we are working on and what we are planning to work on. Start new conversations with how you enjoy your hobbies or your favourite music. This lets other people know that you are indeed human, and it also gives you an identity other than your work persona. Be authentic. It is healthy for you, and others to know the real and whole you. You are fab 🙂

Tip 9: Help other people and accept help yourself. Lift one another up, support colleagues, show gratitude, offer support and guidance where you can. Be a mentor. Be a positive role model. Be the change you want to see in the workplace and accept all of this in return. This will not only make you feel good, it will change the culture of your workplace, and bring about reciprocity for everyone’s success.

LiftEachotherUp_libbyvanderploeg

(Image via http://www.libbyvanderploeg.com/#/lifteachotherup/)

Tip 10: Celebrate the successes of yourself and others. Yes. Focus on the great things that you and your colleagues have achieved. However big or small, these feelings of success will snowball into a self fulfilling prophecy, where you feel valued, supported and part of a team that cares. Some people will feel uncomfortable about doing this, and feel icky when they see others wallow in their own brilliance. But what is the alternative? We all talk about how rubbish we all are? How will that make us feel?…

Spend time reflecting on what you have achieved. Write them down…use these achievements to inform your own vision of yourself…This is who you are. You are great.

As long as the feelings of celebration and success are reciprocated and directed towards others as well as yourself….Let the high fives roll.

Image result for the highest of fives gif

I do hope that these tips will resonate with some academics looking for something new to try. In the spirit of sharing, please feel free to add more tips below.

You deserve to be happy – Until next time, look after yourselves and each other ❤💙💜

 

0

Mentorship in healthcare and research: Role modelling for excellence

Image result for bad mentor

Mentoring, coaching, role modelling, training…. leading….Whatever you want to call it, I would be nothing without it. That phrase was once hurled at me as an insult…

YOU WOULD BE NOTHING WITHOUT ‘X’ – Well yes..That is true.

Image result for mentor

Workplace cultures in healthcare and research are created and shaped by what we do rather than what we say. Simply put, the way we behave is how we end up living. Although we can all be influenced by what we see, hear and experience …YOU can choose how you will and won’t behave. You can equally decide what behaviour you will and will not accept from others. But who will show us the way we want to go?

Image result for behave how you want to live

As I remember training to be a midwife, many people said …”‘take the good bits and leave the bad bits’ out of your own practice, as you develop and grow alongside your mentor”. I did this, and yet it took me a long time to define who I wanted to be as a professional. Some mentors were good, and some mentors less so – personal preference perhaps?… Many tried to direct the way in which they wanted me to go, and it took great courage for me to challenge this directive behaviour. However, as my career progressed, I was able to study Leadership in health and social care at Masters degree level. This really helped me to understand the theories behind good and bad mentorship…

Image result for good mentorship

A good mentor:

  • Has confidence in you
  • Trusts you
  • Empowers you
  • Gives constructive feedback
  • Wants you to succeed
  • Supports your new ventures
  • Listens to your new ideas
  • Identifies your strengths and helps you develop them into constructive outputs
  • Identifies your weaknesses and helps you manage them effectively
  • Shares their wisdom
  • Gives you wings to fly
  • Behaves with integrity, professionalism and dignity
  • Inspires you
  • Is kind to you (and others)!
  • Feeds your passions and thirst for new opportunities
  • Invites you into their network of expertise
  • Grows with you as you as a professional

A bad mentor:

  • Is concerned only with their own success
  • Talks about doing things that never happen ‘All talk’
  • Is always negative about everything and everyone
  • Is never around
  • Cannot commit to your development
  • Bullies you
  • Dictates how you must behave
  • Doesn’t pay attention to the way you would like to develop professionally
  • Never admits when they are wrong
  • Refuses to believe that you may know more than them in certain areas
  • Compares you with others (negatively)
  • Never lets you progress
  • Kills your confidence
  • Makes you feel bad about yourself

Once you find your way, it is important to find the courage to decide which behaviours you are willing to accept, and to role model yourself for the benefit of others. These are important choices to make, as they will contribute to the cultures in which you and your colleagues will be working. Ask yourself the following:

Image result for question time

  • What do you need in order to be productive?
  • What do you need from others in order to thrive professionally?
  • How do you want to behave?
  • What are you willing to accept?

The answers to these questions must be acted upon. Have the courage to communicate these needs…Others will want you to succeed, they will appreciate this information…

…If not…..are you willing to accept that?

My final tip for ultimate success is to find your flock. Gravitate towards those who inspire you… hang around with those who allow you to fly…. learn from those who lift others up and share your thoughts with those who seek out change.

I would be nothing without my ‘Flock’…my wonderful mentors and my inspiring colleagues.

Each and every one of us ‘mentor’ a growing professional every day (whether we realise it or not)! Therefore each and every one of us needs to decide how we want to behave every day..We all create the workplace cultures, leaders and workforce of the future. Lets create something wonderful…

Image result for success

Thank you to all of you wonderful mentors out there….

Until next time, look after yourselves, and each other 💙💜💚

0

The #DNAofCare …Listening to #NHS staff Stories #Exp4ALL

dna-of-care

This excerpt from Patient Voices explains  what this project is about…”Just as care in the NHS is free at the point of need, NHS staff carry within them a vast reservoir of expertise and experience that is free at the point of telling: their unspoken, unheard stories of care and caring.

The intertwined relationship between patient care and staff well-being has been likened to the double helix. And so the stories we tell each other are like the DNA of care, transmitting information and shaping cultures, offering learning opportunities and, sometimes, healing.

There is often a cost to gathering these stories, but… as the wonderful Dr. Karen Deeny (Head of NHS staff Experience from NHS England) explains…

In the first half of 2016, NHS England funded Patient Voices workshops for staff to create their own digital stories about working in healthcare. The intention is that the stories will be used to help other people understand the reality of working in healthcare so we may all learn from experiences, both good and bad; sharing stories in this way helps contribute to healthcare that is safer, more dignified, more humane and more compassionate for everyone.”

Image result for ica london

The event in London on the 2nd November 2016 was a showcase and celebration of these stories, in a bid to make real change and create new knowledge and understanding within the healthcare services. I really enjoyed the day, made some wonderful reflections and saw some real transformations. I was honored to be there and hear these private, powerful and passionate NHS staff stories shape the DNA of the care that we all give.

We sat in a wonderfully intimate London Cinema patiently waiting to hear the stories and insights from NHS staff in relation to a multitude of clinical and very personal events. The storytellers were able to introduce their stories personally, having created them over a period of 3 days, where they had clearly invested their heart and souls in communicating the greatest joys and pains of their work and their lives as they experienced them.
Thank you for sharing.
All of the staff stories can be accessed here… But for me, the most powerful story was Claudia’s story…’Pieces’..
Claudia has worked and lived in different countries, and different parts of one country. Medicine, healthcare, cannot save everyone and when death, severe illness or harm happen unexpectedly ,a serious untoward incident (SUI) has to be reported. This is one story of one incident and one team in a hospital somewhere.
This story really shows how an entire team of staff can be directly affected by a patient event. This is really poignant when we look at a case from the ‘back door’… the ‘locked door’ that most of us rarely think of or see. When a patient dies….we are patient and family focused. It perhaps feels selfish or wrong to think of the pain, fear and blame that staff may simultaneously be feeling….Feelings of ‘What if’.
Lessons are learnt and improvements are made. But the staff may leave, react poorly or feel unable to go on. They will also be shaken to the very core….their professionalism and competency tested to the limits of idealized ‘coping’. Nobody can take ‘The magic resilience pill’ for this.
As a midwife, I could personally relate to the story graciously shared by Rachel Scanlan (@rgscanlan) – There are no words to really add to this deeply emotive story. To me it was actually an experience to be seen and reflected upon in private silence. The respect and dignity of the events shared are highly personal, and yet I know that many midwives will be able to relate to these same thoughts, feelings and experiences. The tenderness described between those involved is truly heartwarming. I can only wish for greater targeted support for those midwives who share these emotionally laborious life experiences in partnership with colleagues and the families they care for. Thank you for sharing this. I will certainly be sharing this story in order to drive better outcomes for maternity services and the midwifery profession as a whole.
It was poignant that we listened to emotional NHS staff stories on . There were many strong messages I took from the day.

Dr. on the importance of a positive Staff experience. “It’s not an ‘indulgence’…it drives better outcomes!”

 

Two final thoughts or observations for me were as follows. It was seemingly the brightest and most passionate NHS staff who had been worn down and disenchanted by their NHS workplaces, having been left unheard and unsupported. These bright sparks were then moving into academia where their ideas and talents can be nurtured and turned into really meaningful change. In essence, we are loosing the brightest talent from front line services, as they are told to ‘keep their heads down and get on with the job’. This experience resonates with me personally as I too.

Ultimately it is this message that I took from the day…

It is also this message that I intend to take forward in my own collaborative work projects. The collaborations and inspired connections that I made at this event makes me ever more hopeful that we will all come together with this shared vision and drive to make things better.

The way we intend to make things better is by focusing on the relationship between the NHS patient experience and the NHS staff experience….the .

As you can imagine, the Twitter activity on this event was fairly inspiring -> Check out  for more reflections from this event…

1

Why the health, wellbeing & engagement of #NHS staff matters..financially, practically & morally speaking…

wellbeing-of-nhs-staff-a-benefit-evaluation-model
I spend a lot of my time talking to clinicians, managers, commissioners, those outside of healthcare and leaders about the importance of promoting and supporting staff wellbeing within the #NHS workplace. Some are already on board with the reality that excellence in healthcare simply cannot happen in the absence of a workforce that is cared for and nurtured to thrive. Others feel discomfort at the thought of caring for staff when the ‘patient comes first’ and some simply don’t know what to do for the best. In any case, nobody seems to want to destroy the NHS workforce (correct me if I am wrong)!… and everyone seems to want to learn more.

A good staff experience where staff feel ‘engaged’ is critical to  achieving excellence in healthcare…What do we mean by ‘Staff Engagement’?

‘Institute for Employment Studies (IES), defined staff engagement as a positive attitude held by the employee towards the organisation and its values. An engaged employee is aware of business context and works with colleagues to improve performance within the job for the benefit of the organisation. The organisation must work to develop and nurture engagement which requires a two-way relationship between employer and employee (Robinson et al 2004, p 4).’
Recently, I was asked to provide some evidence as to why the wellbeing of NHS staff matters by someone else who was keen to make a difference in this area. They needed to make the case to others in order to make change happen. I imagine that lots of other change makers will be needing to provide evidence too, and so I have set out some arguments for the case below. I hope many of you will find it useful to have some of the arguments in one place.
Image result for staff engagement nhs employers

Please feel free to share this evidence widely with others…. If you have other evidence to add to this, please feel free to comment below…

(There can never be too much to share)!

Financial reasons to care for NHS staff:

Over 2014/2015, the NHS Litigation authority (NHSLA) paid over £1.1 billion to patients who suffered harm and their legal representatives, this coming year it will be c £1.4 billion and with accumulated provisions in our balance sheet of over £28 billion further significant increases are already in the pipeline. When staff are unwell, in psychological distress, communication is hampered by poor working cultures and there is a lack of staff engagement, NHS staff are more likely to make medical errors (Hall et al, 2016).

Good staff health, wellbeing & engagement = reduced medical errors = reduced litigation costs

Estimates suggest that recruiting a nurse from overseas costs between £2,000 and £12,000 and return-to-practice costs some £2,000 per nurse, while training a new nurse costs around £79,000. Additionally, recruitment costs to replace staff who leave owing to work-related stress and/or poor job satisfaction is estimated to be £4500 (More for senior posts). As such, in order to get best value for money, the NHS will need to work hard to retain and recruit a high quality workforce.

Good staff health, wellbeing & engagement

= Increased recruitment and retention = Best value for money

Staff sickness absence rates cost an estimated £3.3million annually per NHS organisation. When staff are absent, there is the added cost of agency staff to fill in gaps (The NHS Improvement team now expect the NHS to spend a total of £3.7 billion on agency staff by the end of the 2015/16 financial year).The Francis inquiry into Mid Staffordshire also exposed the consequences for patients and staff of not addressing this issue of staff morale and sickness. Typically, if an NHS organisation reduced staff sickness rates by a third,it would provide an additional 3.4 million working days a year for NHS staff, equivalent to 14,900 full-time staff, saving an estimated £555 million.

Good staff health, wellbeing & engagement = Decrease in sickness absence = reduced agency/sickness spend & therefore, improved patient care

Image result for staff engagement nhs healthcare
(Image source :http://www.slicedbread.co.uk/solutions/employee-engagement/)

Practical reasons to care for NHS staff:

Ultimately and practically, the NHS exists to provide high quality and safe care to patients. Evidence so far shows that better staff health and wellbeing is associated with improved patient outcomes.
Some of the many benefits to improved NHS wellbeing is that better staff health results in lower infection rates and lower standardised mortality figures. The Keogh review of 14 hospital trusts with high patient mortality rates found all these trusts also had higher levels of staff sickness, compared to national average.

Good staff health, wellbeing & engagement = Safer and higher quality patient care

When an NHS organisation invests in staff health, wellbeing and engagement, they improve their ‘Brand’. Branding is one of the most important aspects of any business, large or small, and its impact shouldn’t be underestimated when it comes to engaging staff with health and wellbeing initiatives.

Good staff health, wellbeing & engagement = Your NHS organisation looks good & therefore attracts more staff

A report from the Kingsfund suggests that job satisfaction, organisational commitment, turnover intentions, and physical and mental wellbeing of employees are predictors of key organisational outcomes such as effectiveness, productivity and innovation. Everyone wants more of these things..right? They all have the potential to save money and improve the safety and quality of care.

Good staff health, wellbeing & engagement = Higher productivity, staff effectiveness and innovation = Cash savings and better services

Image result for staff engagement nhs healthcare

Moral reasons to care for NHS staff:

Staff are entitled to a psychologically and physically safe professional journey. Caring for them is not an optional issue, it is an ethical one.

 

When staff are well cared for, they experience greater job satisfaction, improved morale and general wellbeing. Few aspire to be ill, and many feel great shame in letting others down or asking for help.
Where the emotionality of distressing work  remains unrecognised and void of support, distorted thinking, emotional distress, reduced productivity, increased sickness rates, poor decision making, and maladaptive patterns of behaviour may present. Physical symptoms can also result, where severe job stress evokes irregular menstrual bleeding patterns for female healthcare workers, poor sleep quality and bodily exhaustion.
The NHS workforce is one of the largest work forces in the world. They are patients, they are the public, as are their friends and families. As such, by caring for this group, we are also caring for a large part of society. Moreover, there is also a strong statistical link between the wellbeing of staff and patient satisfaction. This means that if we are failing to care for staff, we are also missing an opportunity to improve patient satisfaction.

Good staff health, wellbeing & engagement = A nice and decent thing to do for all.

Image result for staff engagement nhs employers

There are many more reasons for NHS organisations to care about the the health, wellbeing & engagement of their staff..Financially, practically & morally speaking… Please feel free to add these below.
I hope that these few facts and figures can be shared and used to convince everyone throughout the NHS of these facts. Many will say that it is the patient that must come first. However, I argue that excellence in health and social care may only be achieved if both the staff and patients are cared for equally, as they work in partnership to achieve the best outcomes.

Looking for ways to turn this vision into practice? See my blog on 20 ways to create a thriving NHS workforce here

Until next time, look after yourselves and each other 💛💙💜💚.
1

#IDM2016 – Celebrating #Kindness to other #WeMidwives & Ourselves with @WeMidwives @world_midwives & @MidwivesRCM

I am blogging today in order to celebrate the International Day of the Midwife hosted by @world_midwives. This event is going from strength to strength, am I especially excited about some of the themes being highlighted this year!

The @WeMidwives community is celebrating the fact that “Kindness to others & yourself -does improve workplace health” – They ask that we share how we care for ourselves and one another as midwives.

The International Confederation of Midwives (ICM – @world_midwives) are also on board with this, announcing that we all must: Nourish the support system among midwives » Have a celebratory event where midwives can meet each other and learn about each other’s challenges and achievements and share coping mechanisms to support each other.

Also, @world_midwives have promoted another great activity: ‘I Am A Midwife, This Is What I Do’

They are inviting midwives to share the work they do using the “I am a midwife, this is what I do” activity on social media as a celebration of midwifery around the world. In their example they show a “Technical midwife adviser” – It is wonderful to see a wide range of midwifery roles being celebrated. This reminds us that you don’t have to be on the front line to contribute greatly to the profession. Research midwives, technical midwives, midwife educators and policy advisers all shape and contribute to the midwifery profession in their own unique way. The important thing to do is to embrace our diversity within the profession and unite in camaraderie and support for one another.

Last week, just ahead of #IDM2016, the Royal College of Midwives (@MidwivesRCM) launched their new guidance on ‘Work-Related Stress’ for heads of midwifery and individual midwives themselves.

RCM - ‘Work-Related Stress’.

I was thrilled to have our latest paper cited and referenced within this guidance as follows:

All this [Work-related stress] damages productivity and can affect outcomes for women. The research paper ‘Midwives Overboard!’ states: “Midwifery care aims to support optimal outcomes in childbearing. If, when caring for women, the potential consequences for midwives are ignored, we risk their capability to provide midwifery care to the high levels they aspire to. This threatens the very eminence of midwifery as a profession.” It also says: “Ethically, midwives are entitled to a psychologically safe professional journey… when maternity services invest in the mental health and wellbeing of midwives they may reap the rewards of improved patient care, improved staff experience and safer maternity services.”

Click here to see the full paper

So it really does seem that this topic I feel so passionate about is really gaining some much needed attention, and I am thrilled to influence guidance from my professional body is this way.

For made their theme “Workplace Stress: a collective challenge” free to read! Everyone is getting involved 🙂

Our own research project which explores what  for health care staff continues to thrive via @NHSStaffExp Please use the  hashtag to contribute your thoughts.

See full details here →  ..Please spread the word 🙂

Also, please check out The Virtual International Day of the Midwife     A great 24 hour conference for  – Catch up with the seminars online when you can!

Lastly, my favorite charity – is hosting many Muffins for Midwives events and is asking people to tag themselves and their muffins in photos for  – YUM!

Until next time….Take care of yourselves, and each other.