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Resilience: Showing strength in the face of adversity #usmsconf17

Here are a few pictures and thoughts shared from the @ussumidwifery ‏ conference ‘Resilience: Showing strength in the face of adversity ‘… Thank you to everyone who came to see the great speakers at this conference. It was a great honour to present my work alongside some of the wonderful researchers listed on this programme…Having spoken at many conferences, I can also say that these student midwives really know how to look after their guests….Thank you  and ..❤🎓😍

Taken from The knitted midwife’s blog: ‘The Royal College of Midwives has highlighted that the UK is still short of 3500 midwives.  This is an update to the published report here.  The update to the report can be seen here. Whilst this is an improvement on the 5000 midwives needed three years ago, this chronic shortage adds to the pressures that midwives are facing every day in their working environment.  Additionally there is a ‘retirement time bomb’ as over a third of the current midwifery workforce is aged 50 or over.’…these knitted midwives represent the midwives missing from the workforce.

All of the speakers at this conference were indeed inspiring, but one message seemed to remain strong throughout…

”BUILD a tribe – don’t wait to find one’ – Prof Mavis Kirkham

Reminds me of the #Findyourflock story last year

We also had  from tell us to “find our tribe”

😊💛

One of the most inspiring parts of the day was seeing student midwife Hannah Cook get a standing ovation at … the future of midwifery is bright…..She will be re presenting her talk at this year’s  awards conference….If you can….get there!

✨

I too feel as if being a midwife is what I am…I also feel that it is written through me like a piece of rock. It is my professional identity. But having resilience as a midwife is not about ‘toughening up’ as  puts it…..

I am not even sure if resilience is the right word for what we are talking about here… Resilience is not a magic pill!

💊💉🌡

The most interesting conversations of the day in my opinion were around the ethics of caring for midwives, and bullying. There is still so much more to do….and I still see uncaring behaviors taking place. Are we an insecure profession?…trying that much harder to prove ourselves?…or are we embittered by another pill too difficult to swallow?…one this is for sure…

Image result for wrong is wrong quotes

This day gave me the chance to meet with and listen to some of my research heroes…Thank you to everyone who engaged in my presentation and to those who continue to engage as my work as it continues…

#usmsconf17

If you would like to follow the progress of my work going forward..

Follow me via @SallyPezaro; The Academic Midwife; This blog

Until next time…Look after yourselves and each other 💚💙💜❤

 

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The 5 stages of academic rejection grief

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An academic career has been described as a journey filled with brutal, unrelenting rejection. I frequently find myself having to pick myself up from rejection. It is hard.

In academia..your peers will be some of the most intelligent, creative and driven people in the world. – I have found this to be very true. I am in awe of them all.

Additionally, from the inside, all you ever see is tweets and Facebook posts about how everyone else is winning awards, being featured by the press, or getting cited a thousand times.….Yes. I am constantly celebrating the achievements of my peers…. this is wonderful!…but yes… this does make my own rejections even harder.

Whether it is a paper in a journal, a grant application, your viva or an idea that you have lovingly nurtured and come to love and cherish, there are 5 stages of rejection grief that are more or less inevitable (for me anyway).

Having your work rejected can feel like you have just spent a lifetime nurturing and rearing a beloved child, only to find out that it has grown into an evil and murderous human being in need of ‘Major revisions’!

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1. Denial and isolation

This is wrong. It cannot be. I was so certain that my work was beautiful!…I don’t want to talk about it 😦

2. Anger

How dare the reviewer pull apart my work in this way…do they know nothing???!!

3. Bargaining

OK, I will take a look at the revisions. I will accept comment 4 and 5, but I’m not doing what reviewer 3 wants!

4. Depression

Gah!….these revisions are so laborious and depressing.

5. Acceptance

Oh…OK…phew… it is done. I am happy with it. I am at peace and ready to resubmit!

Image result for who said everything will be alright in the end and if

Feedback is golden…but it can be challenging to accept…it feels like rejection….but we are all actually moving forward ..all of the time. See here about the importance of feedback. I don’t believe that managers, reviewers or examiners are out to get us (not all of them anyway)….and so we must remember that none of this is personal. It is not a rejection of you as an entity, it is a very subjective point of view which may actually improve the work you do.

Try to portray humility and gratitude…Rather than any knee jerk feelings…

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“I’m sorry… you’ve got major revisions to do”

Work that needs major revisions? How will people judge that? How will I be judged? is everything I thought I knew a lie?..what would another reviewer have said? (Most of the time the reviewers all want different things in any case)!

Self doubt, career doubt, black and white thinking and a feeling of doom sets in. ‘I am not good enough’…I begin to catastrophise. But then I reflect…what is really behind success?

Image result for iceberg of success

I think that my approach to revisions needs major revisions. I continue to work on these revisions daily….

Every piece of work that I have ever revised following feedback or rejection has improved. Yet every time…I have to put all of my toys back into my pram before I begin the process of making any changes. I go back and forward around the 5 stages of academic grief..round and around…but it always ends up fine in the end….mostly it ends up better.

I live in constant fear of rejection, failure and disappointing those who I respect most… But we must try to get over our fear of failure and rejection, or we loose the opportunities we have to learn and grow.

Remember…things always feel better in the morning…you will not always feel this way. The cure for academic rejection grief is not always instant success…it is compassion for both yourself and others.

Until next time, take care of yourselves and eachother ⭐🎓⭐

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Reflections from a session in the @empathymuseum at #Expo16NHS #WalkAMileInMyShoes via @HealthFdn

One of the best things I experienced at this years NHS Expo 2016 was the @empathymuseum …where I was invited to #WalkAMileInMyShoes via the @HealthFdn. It was rather strange to be invited into a giant shoe box, but nevertheless… Just like Alice in Wonderland I found myself uttering….’curiouser and curiouser’..

As I wondered in to the cozy shoe box to sit on the sofa, I was asked to put on a pair of shoes.. Theatre shoes…(See below)…

I walked around and listened via headphones to the man who had kindly donated his shoes and his story to this project. He was a specialist nurse working in A & E. He spoke about how he had to face the reality of death at work every day. Not only did he have to do this, he then also had to engage loved ones and relatives in incredibly difficult conversations and help them to make the best decisions in the darkest hours.

This nurse was able to celebrate the incredible gifts people were able to give as organ doners, and see joy in how a family was able to see a part of their departed loved ones go on… All of this was very uplifting…and there was no doubt in my mind that this nurse was indeed a superb example of the profession. However…as I walked on…I found my self wondering whether anyone asked the nurse how he was? How long could he maintain this uplifting approach whilst dealing with death and emotional pain on a daily basis? Would cracks start to appear?

I often see examples of how we celebrate this service and self sacrifice…and to nearly quote Paul Simon… every generation throws healthcare hero up the award charts!.. and so we celebrate this eternal culture of giving. I certainly empathize with this nurse, and greatly admired his approach to his work… He is a hero..but he is also very vulnerable, both psychologically and physically as he continues to give all of himself to provide the best service possible.

My worry is that the more we place service and sacrifice upon a pedestal…the further our heroes have to fall…

 

As you can see from the film above…this really is an amazing and thought provoking project, as those who visit are asked to write messages to those they now share a new found empathy with.

I would have liked to have walked a mile in all of these shoes…and perhaps some day I will have time to…as you can soon also experience this project online here. So as a lasting thought on this amazing project…I would like to repeat my mantra…which is…always be kind to yourselves… and each other….

Until next time 💛💙💜💚❤

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20 Ways to Create a Thriving #NHS workforce: #Leadership Lessons from @BSC_CCG

One head of Midwifery and one clinical matron have come to me this week asking for hints and tips about how they can support their staff (Great!) – They reported high sickness rates, clinical errors, high staff turnovers and stressed out staff. I am, as always, sorry to hear this. So I thought I would put together 20 hints and tips which have been proven to reduce mistakes, reduce complaints, reduce sickness and absence rates, improve retention rates, increase innovation and enthusiasm and create positive working cultures where staff are happy to be at work.

I have been on my travels again this week, one leader I met with in particular inspired me to learn more about how every NHS organisation can drive improvement through leading with compassion and actively supporting their staff in the workplace.

Cherry Dale is currently working within Birmingham South Central CCG (@BSC_CCG)….and her journey towards promoting healthy working cultures and staff well being is truly inspirational . I believe that her example now shines as an exemplar model for us all to follow. She doesn’t just talk the talk either…Her sickness rates are currently down to 0.2% in comparison with 4.44% average within the NHS, her staff engagement is high, recruitment and retention rates are high and the way her organisation can now innovate is amazing.

Hierarchy of needs - employee engagement

As I listened to Cherry’s words of wisdom, trying to take it all in…She pointed me to her latest published paper and her transformation journey -> How to get apples, not cactuses: an organisation fit for purposeMeeting the well being needs of staff and community. By Cherry Dale.

Cherry had a dream to create a “Very different sort of service”…Knowing that performance and well-being were “inextricably” linked, she looked to prioritise mental well being, and was keen to make sure that the needs and resources of staff as well as those using the healthcare services were “at the heart” of the way her organisation worked.

How can we all ensure that this comes to fruition? 20 Hints & Tips:

  1. Ensure that decision making is shared between all operational staff so that everyone is empowered to “Lead and act upon good ideas”
  2. Adopt the management style, promoted by the concept of the “Sunao Mind” (Untrapped, calm and highly adaptable)!
  3. Ensure that there are “No Dark Corners” – Share all knowledge and cascade it throughout, right from the top….This actively promotes ‘no blame cultures’.
  4. Embrace “Stand up meetings” Where staff are encouraged to share what went well, be down to earth and collaboratively share everything openly (30 mins in length).
  5. Imagine your organisation as a “Jigsaw” in which everyone holds a vital piece of the puzzle – encourage them to nurture this and take responsibility for it.
  6. Ensure there are no “Departments”, instead refer to “Natural working areas” so that boundaries are no longer in force and silo working becomes thing of the past.
  7. Ask “Who has the capacity?” to perform a task and “Who needs help?” – staff may be reluctant at first to share when they are at capacity, but in time the culture can metamorphosise into a supportive and emotionally intelligent culture, where staff are given extra support by colleagues whilst they are stretched to capacity.
  8. Ensure that staff realise that this is how you want and expect them to behave…You set the tone in communicating “This is how we do things here!”
  9. Erase the concept of ‘Grades’ or ‘bandings’ – If someone has the talent, motivation and capabilities to do the task…They can and should be empowered to do it! (Follow this with active talent management)
  10. See leaders as coaches and invest in training… for effective communication, ask coaching questions and avoid simply ‘directing’ people.
  11. Ban internal emails! – (A scary thought!) – This promotes conversations, movement and positive staff relationships.
  12. Promote open office spaces where senior staff are situated in the centre to promote open collaborations and discussion.
  13. Listen with interest and encourage staff to speak openly about concerns.
  14. Develop a ‘Human resources working group’ with members from each of your natural working areas to develop guidelines, policies and strategies with those at the top.
  15. Recognise and celebrate achievements, new ideas and acts of kindness.
  16. When staff are not quite themselves..Snappy…Tearful etc… encourage yourself and others to notice and check it out..”Is there anything you would like to talk about?…Feel free to come over and offload”
  17. Consider training all staff in the ‘Human Givens approach’…from this develop a staff wellbeing strategy, wellbeing days and events.
  18. Movable office furniture and bright colours inspire innovation.
  19. Link with the community and #GetInvolved with local fundraisers, initiatives and activities.
  20. Take this leap, make these changes and believe in them. Ripples will occur, people will notice…and your #NHS organisation can reap the same rewards.

As some of you will know… I have strong feelings about the term ‘Resilience’…But I do like this model below:

Resilience

 

Things to ask your team on a regular basis…

Have you laughed today at work?

Do you have someone you feel you can confide in at work?

Do you feel able to contribute to decision making?

Do you know what is really happening in your organisation?

Do you feel able to influence the direction of travel?

(Discuss your findings and create an action plan in response to results…Monitor progress!)

Spheres of control

“Don’t expect apples when you have sown the seeds of a cactus!”

 

Activity: Making the best of me…

1: Ask yourself how others can get the best out of you

2: Offer what you can realistically do

3: Communicate what inhibits your productivity with others

4: Actively describe what you need from others in order to thrive

 

Getting the best of me

A Sunao Mind: Having a sunao (untrapped or open) mind means being tolerant without selfishness, being open to the teachings of others, and being able to find joy in any circumstances. It also means being quiet yet dynamic, dynamic yet quiet. It is a state of mind that leads to the truth.

I hope we can all learn and embrace these lessons within our everyday lives. We know that the mental well being of #NHS staff directly correlates with the quality and safety of patient care…So let’s all create cultures in which we can thrive!

We are all leaders…so let’s all lead the way and leave our foot prints in the sand for those who wish to follow….

Until next time ❤

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The ‘Magic’ #Resilience Pill

There are no consistent definitions for what resilience actually is, yet I am beginning to actively dislike the word. It is beginning to sound as though it might be the magic pill everyone within the #NHS might need to take in order to survive. I am not so sure.

We don’t know much about resilience, yet it has been suggested that healthcare professionals need to be supported, not trained in resilience. I am inclined to agree.

Resilience building has a hidden cost in that “By introducing this focus on developing ourselves into “happy”, “positive” leaders one could argue that we are merely buoying ourselves away from, and in effect delaying, what is inevitable – the call to deal with the reality of our current state of play.”

Having ‘resilience’ puts the ownership of survival upon the beholder….. Does this mean that “You have had your resilience training (or ‘pill’) therefore you should be resilient now”? …. Will there be no room to show anything other than a new found ability to ‘cope’?

The NHS is a challenging place to work, and healthcare professionals are doing their best to survive and deliver the compassionate care that they wish to give. So should we be making the NHS a less challenging place to work? or be toughening up those who work there to become ‘resilient’ to adversities?

This is going to be a relatively short post, but I wanted to write down a few analogies that may help us all in thinking about what ‘resilience’ may really mean for us.

If you were being punched repeatedly in the face, would you:

A) Try to become resilient to the pain?

or

B) Try to reduce/stop the punching?

Perhaps a bit of both, but you see my point. The girl in the street who gets attacked does not need to wear a longer skirt, fight back harder or scream louder. Her attacker needs to stop attacking her.

The danger comes when staff feel that they should become more resilient rather than seek support for any pain they may be suffering. NHS staff health is vital to safe and effective patient care, and we would all like to see staff engaging happily with their work.

Yet perhaps the ‘Magic’ #Resilience Pill may actually be the placebo that masks our incredibly valued sensitivity as healthcare professionals.

It has been suggested that:

“The notion of resilience in midwifery as the panacea to resolve current concerns may need rethinking. Resilience may be interpreted as expecting midwives ‘to toughen up’ in a workplace setting that is socially, economically and culturally challenging. Sustainability calls for examination of the reciprocity between environments of working and the individual midwife.”

Whatever the case, it is time to be kind to each other. Always.

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#GoodbyeHeadclutcher campaign significant for Health care professionals in psychological distress

Wow – I have been so impressed with the #GetThePicture campaign this week -> 

I felt that this would also be pertinent for those working within the #NHS who may be struggling with poor mental health. To me, the head in hands image that is used so widely within the media has connotations of those in distress being out of control and unable to manage their condition. Of course there may be times when those in need do hold their head in their hands, but their story will be much wider than this single portrayal of despair. Within the healthcare services, one of the biggest barriers to help seeking is the stigma, and self stigma associated with ‘not coping’ in the professional sense (Renton, 2014). The fear that a healthcare professional may be judged as being professionally as well as mentally unstable means that many health care professionals never seek help or do it after years of suffering (Clark, 1999, Laposa et al., 2003).

The leading reason given for non disclosure in health care professionals is that staff are concerned that the disclosure of mental ill health may negatively affect their careers (Dewa, 2014). With images in the media implying that those with mental ill health are constantly unable to cope and sat in despair, we may see rates of self stigma increase, and rates of help seeking decline. This will paradoxically put patients at risk of compromised care, and drive secrets underground (Moberly, 2014). We all would like to see those in need receive help and feel well. To do do this, they must be willing to seek and receive help. With this in mind, I would be pleased to see future images of those with mental health issues smiling, seeking help, talking and being a part of every day life.

Health care professionals in psychological distress are doing just this, smiling ‘coping’ and working in the #NHS. If we can normalise help seeking, rather than the stigma of not coping, we may be that much closer to healing the healer.

@TimetoChange has suggested the following things to end #Stigma in this area:

  • Picture editors – look for an image that is truly relevant to the story; think about mental health problems as you would when portraying other illnesses; avoid ‘headclutcher’ shots; be sensitive when illustrating stories about suicide and self-harm.
  • Members of the public – take a fun ‘headclutcher’ selfie, and tweet it with #GoodbyeHeadclutcher; if you see a picture you think stigmatises mental health problems in the media, contact that outlet directly, and tweet them with #GetThePicture.
  • Picture agencies – weed out ‘headclutchers’ and other stigmatising pictures from your image libraries; make sure your categories and keywords can help picture editors find appropriate images easily; commission your own range of positive images.
  • Photographers – think of new creative ways to portray mental health problems; use a diverse range of people; take more shots of people being listened to and supported by others.

#TimeToTalk #TimetoChange @TimetoChange

Clark, D. (1999) Anxiety disorders: why they persist and how to treat them. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 37 (1999), pp. S5–S27

Dewa, C. (2014) Worker Attitudes towards Mental Health Problems and Disclosure. The international journal of occupational and environmental medicine, 2014, Vol.5 (4), pp.175-86

Laposa, J. M., & Alden, L. E. (2003) (1). Posttraumatic stress disorder in the emergency room: Exploration of a cognitive model. Behavior Research and Therapy, 41,49–65.

Moberly  , T (2014) GMC is “traumatising” unwell doctors and may be undermining patient safety, Gerada says, BMJ Careers. Available from http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advice/view-article.html?id=20017662 (Accessed 11.11.14)

Renton, T., Tang HEnnis NCusimano MDBhalerao SSchweizer TATopolovec-Vranic J. (2014) Web-based intervention programs for depression: a scoping review and evaluation. J Med Internet Res. 2014 Sep 23;16(9)

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Health Professionals who Die by Suicide – 5 Tips for Change


If the content of this post has affected you in any way, please visit the support page of this blog….

Yesterday was #NHSChangeDay, and I pledged to #StartTheConversation and raise awareness about health professionals who are in psychological distress. As it happens, @WeDocs conveniently hosted a  #WeDocs Tweetchat on preventing suicide in health care professional populations. It was great to see an issue I feel so passionate about being discussed, shared and given some much needed attention. This kind of innovative Twitter usage is one of the things I love about our NHS radicals!

Throughout the conversation, there were seemingly many people concerned and wanting to prevent clinician suicide, but not many solutions to prevention were put forward. -> See the chat summary here

A recent situational analysis into Suicide by clinicians involved in serious incidents in the NHS has identified the current support services available clinical staff, yet there is no consensus on how to effectively support clinical staff, and nobody has yet taken responsibility for the well being of NHS staff (Strobl et al, 2014). This has been further complicated by the fact that Clinicians often have difficulty in recognising symptoms and risk factors associated with their own suicidal behaviour (Goldney et al, 2002). Clinicians are at a higher risk of suicide than the general population, can be misunderstood and left unsupported whilst under immense pressure (Chan et al, 2014). The GMC have recently published a report in regards to a high rate of professionals dying by suicide whilst under investigation. A tragedy for all.

Psychological safety for NHS staff is critical for patient safety and every shiny new white paper will tell you this. But it is also critical for the NHS’s ‘ethical well being’ to care for it’s staff. If the NHS as an organization lets its staff suffer, how will it ever live with itself? The trauma will inevitably become endemic.

So what changes can we make to prevent suicide?

1. We could treat NHS staff as ‘innocent until proven guilty’ & eradicate ‘Name Blame and Shame’ Cultures.

2. Consider that poor behaviour may actually be ‘ill’ behaviour in need of medical treatment before disciplinary action takes place (Brooks et al, 2014).

3. Consider alternatives to discipline & create psychologically safe work cultures.

4.Expose investigation staff to front line clinical practice to understand organizational cultures and pressures.

5. Develop a tailor made national support programme for NHS staff which is confidential, anonymous and provides professional amnesty (The aim of my entire PhD research project)

Also… please keep the conversation going 🙂

Brooks, S, Del Busso, L, Chalder, T, Harvey, S ,Hatch, S, Hotopf, M, MadanHenderson, M (2014) ‘You feel you’ve been bad, not ill’: Sick doctors’ experiences of interactions with the General Medical Council BMJ Open 2014;Vol.4 (7) :e005537 doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005537.

Chan, W., Batterham, P., Christensen, H., Galletly, C (2014) Suicide literacy, suicide stigma and help-seeking intentions in Australian medical students. Australas Psychiatry April 2014 vol. 22 no. 2 132-139

Goldney RD, Fisher LJ, Wilson DH (2002). Mental health literacy of those with major depression and suicidal ideation: an impediment to help seeking. Suicide Life Threat Behav 2002; 32: 394–403.